Arizona Affidavit of Succession to Real Property

Effective September, 12, 2013, the personal property limit is $75,000 and the real property limit is $100,000.

Arizona's statutes provide that probate may be avoided via the use of an Affidavit of Succession to Real Proeprty in cases where the real property owned by an estate is valued at less than $100,000 minus all liens and encumbrances upon the decedant's death. However, such an affidavit cannot be filed with the court until six months after the death of the decedent.

The relevant statute, ARS § 14-3971(E), provides as follows, as of April 2015:

E. No sooner than six months after the death of a decedent, a person or persons claiming as successor or successors to the decedent's interest in real property, including any debt secured by a lien on real property, may file in the court in the county in which the decedent was domiciled at the time of death, or if the decedent was not domiciled in this state then in any county in which real property of the decedent is located, an affidavit describing the real property and the interest of the decedent in that property and stating that all of the following are true and material and acknowledging that any false statement in the affidavit may subject the person or persons to penalties relating to perjury and subornation of perjury:

1. Either:

(a) An application or petition for the appointment of a personal representative is not pending and a personal representative has not been appointed in any jurisdiction and the value of all real property in the decedent's estate located in this state, less liens and encumbrances against the real property, does not exceed one hundred thousand dollars as valued at the date of death. The value of the decedent's interest in that real property shall be determined from the full cash value of the property as shown on the assessment rolls for the year in which the decedent died, except that in the case of a debt secured by a lien on real property the value shall be determined by the unpaid principal balance due on the debt as of the date of death.

(b) The personal representative has been discharged or more than one year has elapsed since a closing statement has been filed and the value of all real property in the decedent's estate, wherever located, less liens and encumbrances, does not exceed one hundred thousand dollars as valued as of the date of the affidavit. The value of the decedent's interest in that real property is determined from the full cash value of the property as shown on the assessment rolls for the year in which the affidavit is given, except that if a debt is secured by a lien on real property, the value is determined by the unpaid principal balance due on the debt as of the date of the affidavit.

2. Six months have elapsed since the death of the decedent as shown in a certified copy of the decedent's death certificate attached to the affidavit.

3. Funeral expenses, expenses of last illness and all unsecured debts of the decedent have been paid.

4. The person or persons signing the affidavit are entitled to the real property by reason of the allowance in lieu of homestead, exempt property or family allowance, by intestate succession as the sole heir or heirs, or by devise under a valid last will of the decedent, the original of which is attached to the affidavit or has been probated.

5. No other person has a right to the interest of the decedent in the described property.

6. No federal estate tax is due on the decedent's estate.

Updated on